East Corner of West Main and North Milam – Evers Building

Karl Itz and Ludwig Evers, Karl’s brother-in-law, acquired the land from Peter Itz in 1867. When the three lots were partitioned, Ludwig took the corner lot. While Ludwig farmed and ranched in the northwestern part of the county, they moved into town in their old age and settled in the little log and rock house which was adjacent to this place. The floorplan of this building was fairly simple. Downstairs there was one large room, with a thick stone wall dividing it from the smaller back room. Underneath is a large cellar. At one time the steps led up along the east wall on the inside of the building, but these have been removed and an outside stairway put in their place. The upstairs was originally one large room, which was later divided with frame partitions. When the building was renovated, the rock walls in the front were knocked out and the show windows and additional upstairs windows were added. At one time the John Knopp family lived upstairs and he operated a saloon downstairs, selling groceries and some staples. During these years this place also figured in the “beer war.” At the time Frederick Probst was brewing beer on the street behind here and it was selling for 10 cents a glass all over town. Knopp sold Pearl Beer from San Antonio and sold it for 5 cents a glass. Probst closed his brewery a few years afterward. Later a doctor, feeling that goat’s milk would cure most people’s ills occupied the building and kept a lot of goats here to supply the demand. He shortly went out of business. The building has housed a dentist office, a millinery store run by Mrs. Louis Henke, Otto Schneider’s grocery store, Walter Knopp’s grocery store, Haversack Wines, W-K Electric, and now David’s Pit Barbecue.

404, 408, 410 West San Antonio – Sunday Houses

Sunday Houses are unique to Fredericksburg. When the settlers arrived, they received ten acres farms and a lot in town. They built these small one-room structures, usually with a sleeping loft or half-story above them reached by an outside stairway, so they would have place to stay when they came for Sunday church services. The families would arrive on Saturdays to shop for needed staples, and to sell their butter and eggs. Saturday night they went visiting or dancing. Sunday evenings they returned to their homes in the country. Families often used them, too, when someone needed to be near a doctor or when children attended confirmation classes. The arrival of automobiles and good roads was the end of usefullness for Sunday Houses. Many found permanent use by older residents who moved to town when they turned their farm or ranch over to their children. (Note: All small houses are not necessarily Sunday Houses.)

Across the street is a Sunday House that has had the front porch enclosed. And around the corner on South Adams in The Yellow House.

Continue West on San Antonio.

506 West Main Street – Loeffler-Weber House

Gerhard Rorig built thislog cabin as shelter from the first winter in Fredericksburg in 1846. Johann Loeffler, a local cabinet maker, added the rock and half timber rooms and cooking fireplace around 1867. His son-in-law, J. Charles Weber, added the lean-to on the side. The house stayed in the Leoffler-Weber family for 90 years, when George and Gloria Hill bought the house and restored it. The lean-to was converted into a bath by the Hills in the early 60s.

Notice the front door. Our ancestors were not as tall as Americans are today. Today, the Loeffler-Weber House is a guesthouse, and can be booked through us.

314 West Creek – Ahrens-Langehennig Home

After an Indian attack that killed Conrad Ahrens’ father, Dorthea, his mother, moved the family from their farm into town. The oldest part of the house is on the west side, a two-room rock house. The family once used the front room as their bedroom and parlor—a common practice at the time. The kitchen was in the back room. Above the front room is an attic, with a laden, or opening, in the west wall, but there was no outside stairway. Two bedrooms were added to the old house, with a front door in each opening onto the porch and one window flanking each door in the front wall. Later owners, the Langerhennigs, remodeled these rooms to include a bathroom and a small storage and laundry area.

Turn left on Crockett street, then turn left on San Antonio Street.

Wings of Freedom Tour happening Wednesday through Friday at airport

Fly in a B-series bomber and fighter aircraft – just like what was flown during WWII during the Wings of Freedom Tour happening this Wednesday, April 6 from 2:00 – 5:00 p.m., Thursday, April 7 from 9:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., and Friday, April 8 from 9:00 a.m. until noon at the Gillespie County Airport. Make plans to take part in this once-in-a-lifetime experience with 30-minute flights in an authentic B-17 or B-24 or an hour flight in a P-51 Mustang fighter. Cost: $425 per person. Walk-through tours are $12 for adults and $6 for children 12 years and younger. For information, call 800-568-8924.

Corner of North Bowie and West Schubert – John Peter Tatsch House

Turn right on Bowie, and stop at West Schubert Street.

The Tatsch Haus, made from local stone by John Peter Tatsch in 1856, is one of the most widely known historic homes in Fredericksburg. Tatsch was a “Tischler” or cabinetmaker and turner. The front two rooms are the original section of the house with the kitchen, fireplace and oven being added later. In 1965 the house was dedicated with a Texas Historic Landmark located on the front of the house. This home is a favorite subject for many history books and detailed floor plans can be found in the Library of Congress. The authenticity of this pioneer home gives you a true feeling of what life was like in Fredericksburg.

The large double wooden doors lead into the bedroom where a double size bed owned by Richard Tatsch was the family’s pride and joy because of the fact it was “factory made”. The living room is adjacent to the bedroom. An inside stairway was a real novelty in its day as most homes only had outside stairways. An authentic kitchen has the original fireplace and cooking pots demonstrating how cooking was done….including a baker’s oven–now sealed. The shutters and the back door are solid with no openings or outside handles designed as a safety measure against the Indians.

605 West Creek – Peter Walter Home

Peter Walter was in the first wagon team arriving in Fredericksburg. He started work on this little fachwerk cottage soon after his arrival in 1846, using materials from the immediate neighborhood. A freight hauler, Walter farmed the surrounding land between supply runs to Fort McKavett. St. Barnabas Parish bought the little house in 1952, restoring and consecrating it as a mission in 1954. When President Lyndon Johnson came to Texas to stay at his ranch, he would often worship at this church.

Continue West on Creek Street.

Wings of Freedom Tour – March 23 to 26

The Wings of Freedom Tour brings historic aviation to your community. See – hear – touch and even ride in one of the aircraft that changed the world. Included in the tour will be a B-17, B-24, P-51 and a Huey Helicopter. Aircraft will be on display and fly from the Gillespie County Airport, 191 Airport Rd. off Hwy 16 S.

419 West Main – Crenwelge Rent House

This house was built in the 1860s or early 1870s as a rent house. It was built on property originally granted to Conrad Kolmeier, whose grandson Otto married Dorothea Crenwelge who lived next door. Wilhelm Crenwelge bought the property in 1856 and it stayed in the family until 1960. The property was bought by Erwin Kraus in 1963. The house is still being rented out.

The Original Texas Star Trail Ride – February 28 to March 8

480_A_IMG_1477Join us as we ride The Original Texas Star Trail through Fredericksburg, Luckenbach, Stonewall, Johnson City, Blanco, Fischer, Wimberley and Driftwood. Each year, about 300 people take part in the 112 mile ride. It’s the experience of a lifetime and one you will not forget. We cross 40 cattle guards through more than 20 Texas Hill Country ranches, including the LBJ Ranch. Spectators welcome! Please visit the website for more information.

Phone: (512) 791-2503