The Original Texas Star Trail Ride – February 28 to March 8

480_A_IMG_1477Join us as we ride The Original Texas Star Trail through Fredericksburg, Luckenbach, Stonewall, Johnson City, Blanco, Fischer, Wimberley and Driftwood. Each year, about 300 people take part in the 112 mile ride. It’s the experience of a lifetime and one you will not forget. We cross 40 cattle guards through more than 20 Texas Hill Country ranches, including the LBJ Ranch. Spectators welcome! Please visit the website for more information.

Phone: (512) 791-2503

419 West Main – Crenwelge Rent House

This house was built in the 1860s or early 1870s as a rent house. It was built on property originally granted to Conrad Kolmeier, whose grandson Otto married Dorothea Crenwelge who lived next door. Wilhelm Crenwelge bought the property in 1856 and it stayed in the family until 1960. The property was bought by Erwin Kraus in 1963. The house is still being rented out.

Texas History Day – February 16

Fredericksburg based Former Texas Ranger Foundation has partnered with the Gillespie County Historical Society and the Texas Heritage Music Foundation of Kerrville, to produce “Texas History Day”, a truly unique event that will be presented at the Pioneer Museum, 325 West Main Street, in Fredericksburg on Saturday, March 16, 2013. The event is scheduled during Spring Break as an outreach program aimed at the youth of Texas to present messages of Texas History and Texas Values.

Daytime programming will focus on character education by presenting the Five Character Traits of the Texas Ranger (courage – determination – dedication – integrity – respect), while being wrapped in the theme of Frontier Texas, through presentations of song, storytelling, magic and field reenactments. An estimated 2,000 – 2,500 people are expected for the outdoor staging portion of the event from 10:00 AM through 5:00 PM, and will culminate that evening with a catered dinner and concert by award- winning Texas author and singer Mike Blakely. Seating for the evening dinner and concert is limited to 200 patrons.

Admission for the daytime activities is $5 for adults, $3 for children age 7 to 17, and children under 7 are free. The evening dinner show is $40. All proceeds will benefit the Pioneer Museum and Texas Heritage Music Foundation.

Make plans to attend this family oriented, entertaining yet educational event …………
WHERE TEXAS HISTORY and TEXAS VALUES COME TOGETHER for TEXAS YOUTH.

For tickets and information contact Evelyn Weinheimer, Event Coordinator, at the Pioneer Museum (830) 990-8441.

506 West Main Street – Loeffler-Weber House

Gerhard Rorig built thislog cabin as shelter from the first winter in Fredericksburg in 1846. Johann Loeffler, a local cabinet maker, added the rock and half timber rooms and cooking fireplace around 1867. His son-in-law, J. Charles Weber, added the lean-to on the side. The house stayed in the Leoffler-Weber family for 90 years, when George and Gloria Hill bought the house and restored it. The lean-to was converted into a bath by the Hills in the early 60s.

Notice the front door. Our ancestors were not as tall as Americans are today. Today, the Loeffler-Weber House is a guesthouse, and can be booked through us.

LBJ’s 103rd Birthday Ceremony – August 27

The Lyndon B. Johnson State and National Historical Parks will hold a birthday celebration on Saturday, August 27 in honor of what would have been LBJ’s 103rd birthday. Festivities at the Hwy 290 E. locations near Stonewall include a wreath-laying ceremony at 10.00 a.m. at the Family Cemetery at the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, followed by an old-fashioned party with games and refreshments at the Sauer-Beckmann Living History Farm at Lyndon B. Johnson State Park and Historic Site. In honor of the significant date, the $2 interpreter’s fee to tour the Texas White House, Johnson’s family home on the Lyndon B. Johnson National Historical Park, will be waived that day. For more information, call 830-868-7128, ext. 231 or visit www.nps.gov/lyjo.

404, 408, 410 West San Antonio – Sunday Houses

Sunday Houses are unique to Fredericksburg. When the settlers arrived, they received ten acres farms and a lot in town. They built these small one-room structures, usually with a sleeping loft or half-story above them reached by an outside stairway, so they would have place to stay when they came for Sunday church services. The families would arrive on Saturdays to shop for needed staples, and to sell their butter and eggs. Saturday night they went visiting or dancing. Sunday evenings they returned to their homes in the country. Families often used them, too, when someone needed to be near a doctor or when children attended confirmation classes. The arrival of automobiles and good roads was the end of usefullness for Sunday Houses. Many found permanent use by older residents who moved to town when they turned their farm or ranch over to their children. (Note: All small houses are not necessarily Sunday Houses.)

Across the street is a Sunday House that has had the front porch enclosed. And around the corner on South Adams in The Yellow House.

Continue West on San Antonio.

Founders Day – May 11

The community is invited to participate in this year’s Founders Day Festival honoring John O. Meusebach and the founding families of Fredericksburg who courageously migrated from Germany and settled here, establishing the city of Fredericksburg. A wreath-laying at the Vereins Kirche at the Marktplatz, located on the 100 block of W. Main Street, will be held at 9:30 a.m. this Saturda immediately followed by a Founder’s Festival at the Pioneer Museum grounds at 325 W. Main St. Refreshments and living history exhibits will be available. The grounds will be open for free from 10:00 a.m. until 5:00 p.m. Come see re-enactors and historical performances, and participate in hands-on activities and games while enjoying the live music. For information, call 830-997-2835.

Corner of North Bowie & West Austin Street – William Bierschwale Home

Alfred Giles was born at in Middlesex, England, on May 23, 1853 . At 17, he apprenticed at an architecture firm in London for two years. In 1873 he emigrated to the United States, settling in Texas in 1875. When he started his own architectural practice in San Antonio in 1876, Reconstruction was coming to an end in Texas, and soon, Giles’ business was booming. Giles designed buildings all across the Hill Country featuring local materials, mainly stone.

The William Bierschwale House was started in 1889. William was County Clerk and a was elected as a Representative to the state Legislature.

Northwest Corner of Orange and Saint Mary’s Street – St. Mary’s Catholic Church

Mariekirche, or the Old St. Mary’s church is one of old Fredericksburg’s landmarks. When the building next door was built in 1906, the original church was remodeled to be a parochial school. When the new school building was built across the street, the old church fell empty once again. For several years, restoration funds were collected through Wild Game Dinners and Damenfests.

St. Mary’s history goes back almost to the city’s founding. The Catholics, who were among the first settlers, worshipped in the Vereins Kirche, and in the home of John Leyendecker, a schoolteacher. In 1847, Fr. Dubois, a Frenchman who later became bishop of Galveston, and Fr. Salazar, a Spaniard, arrived here to hold mass, the first Holy Mass in Fredericksburg. Although they were only here for two weeks, the local Catholics were inspired to build their own church.

The original townlot was granted to Gerhard Rehmann, who, in 1854, conveyed the lot to members of the Roman Catholic Church for $18 cash. Included in the conveyance were the lots where the St. Mary’s Elementary School now stands. For many years this was where the St. Mary’s rectory stood. In the summer of 1849, Fr. Menzel, a native of what is now Czechoslovakia, arrived as minister. Since the church had not been finished, services were held in the Rectory. When he returned to his homeland and year and a half later, he had left behind a large wooden cross to replace the ones left by Spanish missionaries.

In 1853, Bishop Odin of Galveston, who was later transferred to New Orleans, administered the first sacrament of confirmation in the city. In 1859, a popular Jesuit priest, Fr. Weinninger, spent three weeks here. A popular missionary of the day, the parishioners pleaded for him to return. He asked that a church be built as a condition of his return. Work on the Marienkirche started in 1860 and was finished during the early days of the Civil War. The Church’s most distinctive feature is its stone spire, a strong reflection of the homeland Gothic. It has recently been restored. “New” St. Mary’s supplanted the Marienkirche in 1906, more finely detailed and delicate in appearance but equally Gothic, and is one of Texas famed Painted Churches.

The Dinosaur Show – September 20

dinosauergerogeOne day only! One of the largest traveling prehistoric exhibits in North America is coming to Fredericksburg! ”Dinosaur George” of the History Channel’s “Jurassic Fight Club” will present an incredible display of dinosaur skulls including one of the largest T-Rex skulls ever found. You’ll see saber tooth tigers, crocodiles and much more. At the Pioneer Pavilion at Lady Bird Johnson Park. Bring your cameras! Program courtesy of the Fredericksburg Rockhounds.

9 am to 6 pm. Free admission. At Lady Bird Park, Pioneer Pavillion.